JavaFX?

I don’t get it. Everybody (I know) is whining about how Flash is annoying. AJAX is all the hype, and has the potential to replace most uses of Flash using only JavaScript and CSS (I think). Applets and ActiveX thankfully is a thing of the past. Then why is it necessary to reinvent this crap. First came Silverlight (I’ve never seen a single website using it, anybody else maybe?). Now comes JavaFX. Adobe is also doing something I heard. Who needs all this superfluous stuff?

On a related note, I don’t believe anything will replace Flash, as long as it doesn’t come with a cool web-designer compatible application to create these ‘pages’, like Macromedia did. The thing about Flash is not the language or the powerful features/API, it is the fact that web-designers don’t need to know anything about all that. They can just click together these pages and annoy web users with pages that don’t feel like web, don’t behave like web, etc.

Really, I don’t get why companies invest in things like Silverlight and JavaFX. If somebody knows, please enlighten me.

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5 Responses to JavaFX?

  1. Uzytkownik says:

    1. Well – I guess that the real combination to fight Flash int name of the standards is XHTML + JS + CSS + SVG.
    2. > I don’t get why companies invest in things
    Because the web is ‘interactive’ and create ‘new experience’.
    3. The only things I imagince flash & co. is useful are:
    – games (for performance issues – however with the new JS engines…[1])
    – video[2] – you cannot do it in JS[3]

    [1] And the fact that noone can see the code
    [2] However – OGG/Theora please
    [3] I’m aware of video HTML 5 element. However to be honest – nobody will use it before IE 6/7 die. And it will not be soon.

  2. The funniest thing is that if you actually try and download a copy of JavaFX is comes with such a proprietary license that if you would actually follow its terms you cannot actually use it for anything…

    It has such funnies as:

    “Licensee is not authorized to modify, make derivative works of, disclose, distribute, reverse engineer or disassemble the Technology, decompile binary portions of the Technology, or otherwise attempt to derive source code from such portions, or transfer the Technology to any third party or use it in development activities.”

    “Licensee shall have no right to use the Technology for commercial uses or in a production environment.”

    “Java Technology Restrictions. You may not create, modify, or change the behavior of, or authorize your licensees to create, modify, or change the behavior of, classes, interfaces, or subpackages that are in any way identified as “java”, “javax”, “javafx”, “sun” or similar convention as specified by Sun in any naming convention designation.”

    Sigh, you would hope Sun would get it by now, but apparently not :{

  3. Leen Toelen says:

    <Adobe is also doing something I heard

    Adobe IS flash, they have bought Macromedia a while ago, and are pushing the edges of Flash with their Flex programming environment. They also released some of their specifications of the flash protocols and file formats for other implementations. And the Flex IDE is based on eclipse, which is nice as well.
    So when anyone wants to replace flash, they’ll have a very hard time I guess.

  4. shamaz says:

    Adobe is making AIR (which indeed is based on flash and flex).
    In my point of view, AIR, GWT, eclipse RCP and JavaFX are aiming for *enterprise* applications (mostly used on private networks). A proof, is that they provide good integration on Eclipse or Netbeans. They keyword often used is _Rich_ client or application…
    Silverlight and flash have a different goals -> being used everywhere on the web (on website like youtube). (Even if Silverlight CAN do more that ‘beautiful animations and videos’ with XAML)

  5. Chui Tey says:

    HTML is fine if not for the problem of browser compatibility bugs. Sometimes, you can’t dictate what browsers your customer runs, and that includes IE6. No one really enjoys debugging browser quirks because any changes you make forces you to retest for other browsers again.

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